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Find the latest, greatest breaking news on all things Buffalo Bill’s Cody/Yellowstone Country, right here. Check back often so you never miss a beat of the Wild West. Find out what’s new with attractions, events and the towns that make up Park County.

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There are many miles of hiking trails throughout the region.

CODY, Wyo., Aug. 17, 2017 – Fall in Buffalo Bill’s Cody/Yellowstone Country heralds far more than colorful trees. During the months of September and October, visitors see fine Western art and meet the artists who created it. They hear the bugling elk and cowboy music. They taste locally made brews and meals created from regional ingredients. And they experience northwest Wyoming’s abundant outdoor adventures and cultural heritage.

“Fall is a season that is especially appreciated by mature audiences,” said Claudia Wade, director of the Park County Travel Council, the tourism marketing arm for Buffalo Bill’s Cody/Yellowstone Country. “With kids back in school, Yellowstone Country becomes an adult playground that fills the senses with authentic Western pleasures.”

Yellowstone Country is comprised of the towns of Cody, Powell and Meeteetse as well as the valley east of Yellowstone National Park.

Here’s what visitors to Yellowstone Country can expect in the fall:

Western art. The most prestigious event of the year in Cody is Rendezvous Royale, a week-long celebration of authentic Western art Sept. 16-23. Highlights of the week include a workshop about building a Thomas Molesworth-influenced coffee table, a 2½-day painting workshop, live art auction, quick draw event and a glamorous ball on the final night.

Wildlife. The forests, river valleys, mountains and canyons of Yellowstone Country are home to bears, elk, wolves, moose, bighorn sheep, bison, pronghorn, deer, eagles, river otters and many other mammals, birds and other species.

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Fall wildlife viewing includes the elk rut.

Blue-ribbon trout fishing. Yellowstone Country is home to several top fishing spots including the North and South Forks of the Shoshone River. Cody is home to several fishing outfitters that can offer guides, maps and advice.

Fall bounty. Local and sustainable food offerings have continued to expand in Cody, resulting in several restaurants and stores that incorporate the bounty of northwestern Wyoming ranchers and farmers into their offerings. Not surprisingly, beef and bison are readily available, but many locations also offer freshly harvested produce and locally made beer and wine.

Hiking. Yellowstone’s bounty also extends to its hiking trails, which are numerous throughout the region. Local favorites include the Bluebird Trail on Bureau of Land Management land five miles from town. Cedar Mountain Trail, begins with a strenuous uphill climb, and hikers are rewarded with spectacular views from the summit. The Prickly Pear Trail is a paved walking trail that circles two lakes.

Rock climbing. The region is well-suited to climbing, with porous rock creating drainages and rock formations that appeal to climbers of all abilities. Conditions are typically good for rock climbing through October. Local outfitters lead classes and rock-climbing expeditions throughout the region.

Driving. Yellowstone Country road-tripping in the fall is a memorable way to enjoy fall color, with five scenic drives leading into Cody that take travelers past some of Wyoming’s most breathtaking valleys, mountain passes, rivers and forests.

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Dan Miller’s Cowboy Music Revue continues through Oct. 7.

History. The Heart Mountain WWII Interpretive Center at the site of the Heart Mountain Internment Camp offers a glimpse of the lives of some 14,000 Japanese-American citizens who were interned there during World War II. Opened in August 2011, the center explores that difficult period of the country’s history with thoughtful exhibits that encourage visitors to ask the question “Could this happen today?”. The storied life of the town’s founder, Colonel William Frederick Cody, is presented in the recently reinstalled Buffalo Bill Museum, one of five museums that comprise the Buffalo Bill Center of the West. There are also museums dedicated to firearms, fine Western Art, the Plains Indians of the region and the Greater Yellowstone ecosystem.

Music. Dan Miller’s Cowboy Music Revue continues its performances of cowboy music, poetry and comedy Monday through Saturday night through Oct. 7. The Cody Cattle Company provides a casual evening at picnic tables with music and a chuckwagon dinner through Sept. 23.

Tours The Cody Trolley Tours’ “Best of the West” tour provides a terrific introduction to the destination. This informative one-hour tour covers 22 miles and helps orient visitors to where things are and what they might like to go back to see.

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Yellowstone Country is comprised of the towns of Cody, Powell and Meeteetse as well as the valley east of Yellowstone National Park.

The area of Park County is called “Buffalo Bill’s Cody/Yellowstone Country” because it was the playground of Buffalo Bill Cody himself. Buffalo Bill founded the town of Cody in 1896, and the entire region was driven and is still heavily influenced by the vision of the Colonel. Today its broad streets, world-class museum Buffalo Bill Center of the West and thriving western culture host nearly 1 million visitors annually.

Related hashtags: #YellowstoneCountry #CodyWyoming #CenteroftheWest #BuffaloBill #Yellowstone #Wyoming

Media contact:

Mesereau Travel Public Relations

(970) 286-2751

mona@mesereaupr.com

tom@mesereaupr.com

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CODY, Wyo., Aug. 7, 2017 – The biggest celestial event of the century is occurring in a few weeks, and residents and visitors in Wyoming will have front row seats.  
 
Although Buffalo Bill’s Cody/Yellowstone Country is slightly north of the total solar eclipse path that is cutting through the width of the state on August 21, viewing is still expected to be excellent. Cody is expecting a 98 percent obscuration rate, meaning that only a sliver of sun will be viewable as the moon passes in front.
 
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Beck Lake Park near the airport features asphalt trails around two reservoirs.

 “The unobstructed skies of Yellowstone Country are perfect for viewing the eclipse, and all eyes will be on the sky that morning,” said Claudia Wade director of the Park County Travel Council, the marketing arm for the region. “We recommend that locals and visitors alike grab their protective eclipse eyewear – which they can purchase for a nominal fee from the Cody Chamber of Commerce – and settle in for a once-in-a-lifetime experience.”
 

Protective eyewear essential

Experts urge everyone who intends to experience the eclipse, regardless of location, to purchase protective solar eclipse eyewear. In Yellowstone Country, visitors and locals can purchase disposable glasses for $5. These glasses are an essential precaution to prevent the sun’s powerful rays from burning the retinas and potentially causing damage and even blindness.
 

Where to watch

Skygazers in Yellowstone Country have many options, from one of Cody’s city parks to remote Bureau of Land Management trails. Here are some suggestions.
 
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City Park is convenient for people already in town.

·        Beck Lake Park is a city park near the Yellowstone Regional Airport with two miles of asphalt trails encircling two large reservoirs. Points along the trail offer spectacular views of the town and beyond.  
 
·        Situated on the shore of the Buffalo Bill Reservoir, Buffalo Bill State Park is a good choice for boaters, campers, paddlers and anglers who want to combine a day of viewing with other outdoor fun. The brainchild of town founder Buffalo Bill Cody, the massive reservoir provides irrigation to the farms and ranches throughout the region.
 
·        Cody’s City Park is centrally located within steps of the Buffalo Bill Center of the West, and it is a good choice for travelers who plan to tour the town after the eclipse. The park features an outdoor stage that is often used for Cody’s many events and festivals as well as manicured grass for visitors to bring along a picnic.
 
·        The charming nearby town of Meeteetse is another possibility. The town may be the most fitting place for friends to meet for a viewing party because the name of the town is derived from an Indian phrase that means “meeting place.” The town’s old-fashioned wooden boardwalk lining both sides of main street will provide a fitting authentic Western backdrop such an unusual Wyoming experience.
 
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The solar eclipse will pass over Wyoming with Cody close to the complete blockage of the sun.

·        Four Bear Trail is a Bureau of Land Management area to the west of the Buffalo Bill Reservoir. The trail – open to hikers and equestrians – summits at about 7,600 feet and offers spectacular views of the North Fork Shoshone River Valley and the volcanic spires and red rock formations of the region. Wildlife like golden eagles and bighorn sheep can often be viewed from the trail.
 
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Yellowstone Country is comprised of the towns of Cody, Powell and Meeteetse as well as the valley east of Yellowstone National Park.
The area of Park County is called “Buffalo Bill’s Cody/Yellowstone Country” because it was the playground of Buffalo Bill Cody himself. Buffalo Bill founded the town of Cody in 1896, and the entire region was driven and is still heavily influenced by the vision of the Colonel. Today its broad streets, world-class museum Buffalo Bill Center of the West and thriving western culture host nearly 1 million visitors annually.
 
Related hashtags:  #YellowstoneCountry #CodyWyoming #CenteroftheWest #BuffaloBill #Yellowstone #Wyoming  
Media contact:
Mesereau Travel Public Relations
(970) 286-2751
mona@mesereaupr.com
tom@mesereaupr.com
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The Wolf Mine is part of Meeteetse Museums’ Annual Kirwin Tour.

What’s Ahead in Late Summer and Fall in Buffalo Bill’s Cody/Yellowstone Country; Events Showcase Region’s Legends, Local Talent and Western Traditions

 

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The “Great Dam Day” will showcase the Buffalo Bill Dam.

CODY, Wyo., July 21, 2017 –  A pilgrimage, fair, free concerts, art show and air show are in the line-up of fun events awaiting visitors to Buffalo Bill’s Cody/Yellowstone Country during the late summer and fall. The events reflect the authentic Western heritage and array of outdoor adventures in this small northwestern Wyoming town of 11,000 residents.
 
“What Cody lacks in population we make up in enthusiasm and creativity, and each one of these events reflects a massive investment of time and energy by dedicated planners,” said Claudia Wade, director of the Park County Travel Council, the marketing arm for the region. “Many of our visitors are surprised at the high caliber of the festivities and the welcoming attitude of our locals. We are an open-arms community, and we work hard to ensure that our visitors leave town with great memories of their Western adventures.”
 
Comprised of the towns of Cody, Meeteetse and Powell and the East Valley of Yellowstone, here’s what’s planned for the coming months in Buffalo Bill’s Cody/Yellowstone Country:
 
Now through Aug. 12 on Tuesdays, Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays – The Cody Monologues: Famous & Infamous Women of the West. The Studio Theater at the Cody Center of the Performing Arts presents the stories of some of the more colorful women of Cody in this 75-minute play. Historical characters including an artist, author, “lady Doc,” lady of the evening and cowgirl from Buffalo Bill’s Wild West Show entertainingly present their life stories.
 
July 22 – Yellowstone Beer Fest. Scheduled from 3 to 8 p.m., proceeds from the non-profit Yellowstone Beer Fest are donated to local charities. The festival includes live music, food vendors and samplings of local and regional craft beers.

 

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The Heart Mountain Pilgrimage will take place July 28-30.

July 19 – 22 and 26 – 29 – Rocky Mountain Dance Theater presents: Buffalo Bill’s Wild West Show. The historic Cody Theater is the fitting location for this show, which has been playing Wednesdays through Saturdays at 8 pm. and Saturday matinees at 2 p.m. since late June. Dancers and actors portray the true story of Buffalo Bill Cody and famous Western characters such as Annie Oakley and Wild Bill Hickock.
 
July 28 – 30 – Heart Mountain Pilgrimage – This annual event sponsored by the Heart Mountain Wyoming Foundation at the site of the Heart Mountain Internment Camp includes panel discussions, banquet, documentaries and special exhibits about this camp where 14,000 Japanese-Americans were incarcerated during World War II.
 
Thursdays through Aug. 24 – Concerts in the Park. Cody’s City Park hosts free concerts Thursday evenings through the end of August. Every week there’s a different band performing a wide variety of music, like bluegrass, folk, country, blues, reggae and Americana.
 
July 29 – Historic Pitchfork Ranch Tour – Hosted by Meeteetse Museums, this tour of the historic Pitchfork Ranch is led by owner Lenox Baker and includes some of the ranch’s historic structures. Built in 1878, it is the second-oldest ranch in the state. The ranch helped owner Count Otto Franc von Lichtenstein launch his career as a cattle baron. There’s also a connection to Butch Cassidy, who launched his career as a notorious Western criminal when he stole his first horse from the ranch.
 
Aug. 5 – Cody Air Fair – The Yellowstone Regional Airport and Choice Aviation host this fair including pilot competitions and free aircraft rides for the kids.
 
Aug. 10 – Annual Buffalo Bill Invitational Shootout – Organized by the Buffalo Bill Center of the West and the Cody Shooting Complex, the shootout showcases the sport of shooting and the history of the country’s firearms industry.
 
Aug. 12 – Annual Kirwin Tour – Hosted by Meeteetse Museums, this tour offers an up-close look at the long-abandoned mining town of Kirwin, located high in the Absaroka Mountains. Participants will see the ghost town’s storage and shop facilities, cabins, sheds and machinery. A highlight of the tour is a short hike to view the foundation of Amelia Earhart’s cabin. Construction on the cabin ended when Earhart disappeared in 1937.
 
Aug. 12 – Plaza Diane Renaissance Fair – Powell’s popular Plaza Diane is the site of this fun family event that includes art projects, games, activities, food vendors, art exhibits and entertainment. Renaissance-themed costumes are encouraged.
 
Aug. 17 – Taste of Meeteetse – This free event showcases cuisine prepared by residents. Donations will benefit Meeteetse Christmas baskets and the Meeteetse Youth Works program.
 
Aug. 18 – 20 – Cody Wild River Fest – The Shoshone River is front and center during this family event featuring river games, fly fishing tournaments, food, music and river sports. Participants can learn ways to keep the river healthy through exhibits and presentations.
 
Aug. 19 – Wings ‘N Wheels Annual Fly-In & Car Show – Located at the Powell Municipal Airport, this event includes an air show, car show and array of vendors.
 
Aug. 19 – Great Dam Day showcases the Buffalo Bill Dam & Visitor Center with a hike down the “Old Dam Road” for a view below the dam, kids’ hike and lunch.
 
Aug. 21 – Great American Total Solar Eclipse – The Cody Visitor Center will be selling eclipse glasses for visitors who wish to see the solar eclipse, which will be viewable from Cody with only 98.05 percent obscuration.

 

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The solar eclipse will pass over Wyoming with Cody close to the complete blockage of the sun.

Aug. 25 – 26 – Cody Country Car Show – Classic cars, hot rods, custom vehicles and muscle cars will be on display at the Denny Menholt Chevrolet, Buick, GMC dealership. There will also be an organized cruise through town, barbecue, judging and awards.
 
Sept. 2 – Annual Chatelaine Quilt Guild Show – The work of local quilters will be on display at Meeteetse Museums through the middle of October. The exhibit includes three-dimensional as well as orthodox pieces.
Sept. 2 – Archaeology Fair – Organized by Meeteetse Museums, this event features archaeology activities at stations throughout town.
 
Sept. 2 – Meeteetse’s Annual Labor Day Celebration – Meeteetse has been celebrating Labor Day in a big way for more than 100 years. Events include a craft fair, parade, games, food, entertainment, sip-and-paint and the final rodeo in the Big Horn Rodeo Circuit.
 
Sept. 7 – 9 – Yellowstone Quilt Festival – Located in the Cody Auditorium, quilters from throughout the region celebrate the art of quilting with contests, a block challenge, raffle quilt, silent auction, vendors mall, exhibit and classes.
 
Sept. 8 – 9 – Trapper Stampede Rodeo – Northwest College in Powell competes in the Big Sky Region, long recognized as one of the toughest competitive regions in collegiate rodeo. Events include bareback bronc riding, saddle bronc riding, bull riding, barrel racing, steer wrestling and team roping.
 
Sept. 8 – Homesteader Days Festival – Celebrating the days of homesteading and farming, the festival includes antique machinery demonstrations, farmers market, craft vendors, hay ride, food, music and entertainment.
 
Sept. 9 – Wyoming Desperados Regional Mounted Shooting Competition – Contestants from throughout the region compete in mounted shooting championships at the Park County Fairgrounds.
 
Sept. 18 – 23 – Rendezvous Royale – One of Cody’s biggest events of the year is this week-long celebration of Western art, studio tours, seminars and more. The capstone of the event is the 36th Annual Buffalo Bill Art Show and Sale on Sept. 22 and Quick Draw Brunch on Sept. 23. This sale of Western-themed fine art includes a broad range of interpretations of the American West in original oil painting, watercolor, sculpture, ceramic and mixed media. The exhibition, housed in the Buffalo Bill Center of the West, is free for public viewing. Main events include a Friday-evening auction, Saturday-morning Quick Draw and Saturday-evening Patron’s Ball.
 
Sept. 24 – Black-footed Ferret Celebration – Hosted by Meeteetse Museums, this annual celebration on the anniversary of the 1981 rediscovery of the black-footed ferret includes a variety of free events. This year documentary filmmaker Virginia Moore will offer a preview of her documentary, “Ferret Town.”
 
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Yellowstone Country is comprised of the towns of Cody, Powell and Meeteetse as well as the valley east of Yellowstone National Park.
The area of Park County is called “Buffalo Bill’s Cody/Yellowstone Country” because it was the playground of Buffalo Bill Cody himself. Buffalo Bill founded the town of Cody in 1896, and the entire region was driven and is still heavily influenced by the vision of the Colonel. Today its broad streets, world-class museum Buffalo Bill Center of the West and thriving western culture host nearly 1 million visitors annually.
 
Related hashtags:
#YellowstoneCountry
#CodyWyoming
#CenteroftheWest
#BuffaloBill
#Yellowstone
#Wyoming
 
Media contact:
Mesereau Travel Public Relations
(970) 286-2751
mona@mesereaupr.com
tom@mesereaupr.com

Exhibits at Heart Mountain Interpretive Center depict the incarceration of Japanese Americans.

Cody, Culture and Kids…Education Looks a Lot Like Fun in Buffalo Bill’s Cody/Yellowstone Country

 

CODY, Wyo., June 27, 2017 – Once the textbooks and report cards are stored away for the summer, kids may think they’re done with all that learning business. In Buffalo Bill’s Cody/Yellowstone Country, there is no need to tell them otherwise. Because attractions in this northwestern corner of Wyoming disguise learning as fun.
 
With an array of “please touch” exhibits and wow-inducing displays that showcase the region’s history and Western spirit and introduce Cody’s larger-than-life town founder, area museums and other attractions will resonate for learners of all ages long after they return home.
 
 “Yellowstone Country’s family-friendly cultural attractions are a terrific complement to our destination’s outdoor adventures like rodeo, fishing and horseback riding,” said Claudia Wade, director of the Park County Travel Council, the marketing arm for the region. “The common denominator for all these cultural attractions is that they capture and showcase the spirit of the American West. And many of the experiences can be directly traced back to the influence of the town’s visionary founder, Buffalo Bill Cody.”
 
Here are examples of Yellowstone Country’s family-friendly cultural attractions.
 

The Plains Indian Museum in the Buffalo Bill Center of the West is a true learning experience.

Buffalo Bill Center of the West (BBCW) – Celebrating its 100th anniversary this year, the Buffalo Bill Center of the West is a world-renowned cultural powerhouse. The Buffalo Bill Museum features wall-sized displays and interactive exhibits spotlighting the showman’s life and times, including the legendary Wild West Show. The Draper Museum of Natural History inspires youthful adventurers with displays that showcase the sights, sounds and even the smells of the region with interactive, innovative exhibits. The center also includes the Plains Indian Museum, Cody Firearms Museum and Whitney Western Art Museum, all with exhibits that will prompt the imagination of youthful visitors. The museum also hosts special events like the Plains Indian Powwow, an annual June event that showcases the talents of dancers, drum groups and artists from Northern Plains tribes.
 
Heart Mountain Interpretive Center – Children may still not fully understand why thousands of Japanese-Americans lived in internment camps during World War II, but they will remember how they lived after seeing this powerful, award-winning museum situated at the site of the Heart Mountain Internment Camp. Designed to resemble the typical barracks-style accommodations that housed its 14,000 internees, the center depicts how families lived in poorly lit rectangular buildings, slept on cots and endured a harsh climate and lack of privacy. There are also displays highlighting poignant stories of friendship, endurance and patriotism.
 
Old Trail Town/Museum of the Old West – Celebrating its 50th anniversary this year, this enclave of 26 authentic frontier buildings includes one used by Butch Cassidy and his infamous Hole-in-the-Wall Gang. One of the town’s many gravesites belongs to Jeremiah “Liver Eating” Johnston – portrayed by actor Robert Redford in the 1972 film. There is a built-in teaching moment too as young visitors are often heard commenting about how small the houses were back then.

The Irma Hotel’s cherrywood bar was a gift from Queen Victoria.

 
Irma Hotel – Listed on the National Register of Historic Places and celebrating its 115th anniversary this year, the Irma Hotel was built by Buffalo Bill and named for his daughter. The hotel’s famous room-long cherry wood bar – still in use today in what is now the hotel dining room – was presented to Buffalo Bill by England’s Queen Victoria.
 
Buffalo Bill Dam & Visitor Center – Completed in 1920, the Buffalo Bill Dam was once the tallest concrete arch dam in the world, and its visitor center showcases not only the dam’s masterful engineering but also emphasizes its impact on tourism and agriculture in the valley. Kids with a penchant for science will learn how water was as much a concern in the days of Buffalo Bill Cody as it is in the West today.
 
Pahaska Tepee – Children whose imagination is sparked by stories of the American West will love stepping inside Buffalo Bill’s hunting lodge, Pahaska Tepee. Buffalo Bill brought his hunting pals – including Theodore Roosevelt and the Prince of Monaco – to this rustic lodge just outside of the East entrance to Yellowstone National Park. Cody was nicknamed “Long Hair” by American Indians in the region, which in their tongue was pronounced “Pahaska.”
 
Cody Mural Visitor Center – Budding artists will enjoy a peek at the murals on display at the Cody Mural Visitor Center located in the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints. The center features an extensive exhibit of paintings and displays that depict the history of Mormon pioneers who immigrated from Utah and Idaho to Wyoming’s Big Horn Basin. There is also the massive Cody Mural on a domed ceiling depicting the history of the first 70 years of the church.
 
Cody Dug Up Gun Museum – Opened in 2009, this museum displays hundreds of relic guns and weapons used throughout American history. The museum is located right in the center of town and is a fun and family-friendly stop.
 
Dan Miller’s Cowboy Music Revue – Hailing from Nashville, singer Dan Miller and his Empty Saddles Band entertain crowds with cowboy songs, poetry and jokes. Presented six nights a week during the summer, the show – which includes an optional dinner – exposes children to a variety of Western music, from cowboy ballads to silly love songs.
 
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Yellowstone Country is comprised of the towns of Cody, Powell and Meeteetse as well as the valley east of Yellowstone National Park.
The area of Park County is called “Buffalo Bill’s Cody/Yellowstone Country” because it was the playground of Buffalo Bill Cody himself.
 
Buffalo Bill founded the town of Cody in 1896, and the entire region was driven and is still heavily influenced by the vision of the Colonel. Today its broad streets, world-class museum Buffalo Bill Center of the West and thriving western culture host nearly 1 million visitors annually.
 
Related hashtags:
#YellowstoneCountry
#CodyWyoming
#CenteroftheWest
#BuffaloBill
#Yellowstone
#Wyoming
 
Media contact:
Mesereau Travel Public Relations
(970) 286-2751
mona@mesereaupr.com
tom@mesereaupr.com

Old Trail Town turns 50.

Summer of Milestones in Buffalo Bill’s Cody/Yellowstone Country

 

CODY, Wyo., June 22, 2017 – The summer season in Buffalo Bill’s Cody/Yellowstone Country is in full swing, and this year is expected to be especially festive, with milestone anniversaries at some of the famous town’s most beloved attractions.

One of the anniversaries this year is the centennial of Buffalo Bill Cody’s death. The legendary showman’s death in Denver on January 10, 1917 and his controversial June burial – funded by The Denver Post and local legislators – is still a matter of legend and intrigue today. Some long-time Cody residents are convinced the town’s founder is buried on Cody’s Cedar Mountain – as was his wish — not in a grave in suburban Denver.

Other anniversaries and milestones in Cody include:

  • 100th anniversary of the formation of the Buffalo Bill Memorial Association, which started the Buffalo Bill Museum, the first of five museums of Buffalo Bill Center of the West.Formed just weeks after Cody died, the association’s modest museum has morphed into a world-class facility with five museums and an acclaimed research library under one massive roof. The museums include the Buffalo Bill Museum, Draper Natural History Museum, Plains Indian Museum, Whitney The Buffalo Bill Center of the West is five museums in one.Western

    The Buffalo Bill Center of the West is five museums in one.

    Art Museum and Cody Firearms Museum. The Center is an Affiliate of the Smithsonian Institution and is accredited by the American Alliance of Museums. A recipient of TripAdvisor’s Certificate of Excellence for 2013, 2014 and 2015, the Center was recently named the “Top Western Museum” by True West magazine.

  • 50th anniversary of Old Trail Town. This enclave of 26 authentic frontier buildings includes one used by Butch Cassidy and his infamous Wild Bunch Gang. One of the town’s many gravesites belongs to Jeremiah “Liver Eating” Johnston – portrayed by actor Robert Redford in the 1972 film “Jeremiah Johnson.”
  • 15th anniversary of the Draper Natural History Museum. With internationally acclaimed exhibits focusing on the ecology and natural history of the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem, the Draper museum’s exhibits are presented as the “Greater Yellowstone Adventure,” with three interconnected galleries – the Expedition Trailhead, Alpine-to-Plains Trail and Seasons of Discovery. The Draper was the first

    The Irma Hotel is 115 years old.

    American natural history museum established in the 21st century.

  • 115th anniversary of the Irma Hotel. In 1902, seven years after he founded the town of Cody, William F. “Buffalo Bill” Cody built the Irma Hotel on the town’s then main street – 12th Street – and named it after his youngest daughter. The Irma is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

 

 

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Yellowstone Country is comprised of the towns of Cody, Powell and Meeteetse as well as the valley east of Yellowstone National Park.

The area of Park County is called “Buffalo Bill’s Cody/Yellowstone Country” because it was the playground of Buffalo Bill Cody himself.

 

Buffalo Bill founded the town of Cody in 1896, and the entire region was driven and is still heavily influenced by the vision of the Colonel. Today its broad streets, world-class museum Buffalo Bill Center of the West and thriving western culture host nearly 1 million visitors annually.

 

Related hashtags:

#YellowstoneCountry

#CodyWyoming

#CenteroftheWest

#BuffaloBill

#Yellowstone

#Wyoming

 

Media contact:

Mesereau Travel Public Relations

(970) 286-2751

mona@mesereaupr.com

tom@mesereaupr.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Scenic Routes in Buffalo Bill’s Cody/Yellowstone Country

 

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The Chief Joseph Scenic Byway.

CODY, Wyoming, June 12, 2017 – Though we’ve evolved from station wagons to SUVs, and paper maps to Google maps, the great road trip vacation has not changed that much over the years.

And that’s a good thing. Especially in Buffalo Bill’s Cody/Yellowstone Country where wide-o“No matter which route you take, there will be something special to see outside your window,” said Claudia Wade, executive director of the Park County Travel Council, the marketing arm of Cody and the surrounding region. “Travelers may experience their first bison jam or find out what it means to be in the badlands. There are free-roaming horse and humorously named rock formations, an ancient and mysterious stone circle and free-flowing hot springs.”pen spaces meet the Absaroka Mountains, where melting snow creates valleys teeming with wildlife, where the views feature unusual rock formations such as “Laughing Pig Rock” and where the next fun activity is a short drive away.

 

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The Heart Mountain Interpretive Center depicts life for World War II Japanese Americans who were incarcerated.

With Scenic Byways leading The Chief Joseph Scenic Byway to the town’s two closest entrances to Yellowstone National Park and multiple roads with historic sites and natural wonders heading into town, the region is a road tripper’s dream.

Here are some reasons why Yellowstone Country is a must-take driving trip:

Chief Joseph Scenic Byway and Yellowstone’s Northeast Gate. Driving in or out of Yellowstone National Park’s northeast gate can be a remarkable wildlife-viewing opportunity as the road travels through Yellowstone’s Lamar Valley, called “America’s Serengeti.” It is typical to see bison and elk in this valley and not uncommon to spot wolves, bears, coyote, bighorn sheep, moose and a wide variety of birds. Stops between Cody and the park include the small towns of Silver Gate and Cooke City, Mont. and the Chief Joseph Scenic Byway. Sights along this route include the single-span Sunlight Creek Bridge, the highest bridge in Wyoming and Dead Indian Pass overlook area where the Nez Perce tribe outran the U.S. Cavalry for several months in 1877. History buffs should also consider taking a side trip on the Sunlight Basin Road (a gravel road) to see the Sunlight Ranger Station, a Civilian Conservation Corps structure built in 1936.

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Rock formations along the Buffalo Bill Scenic Byway are fun to spot.

Buffalo Bill Scenic Byway and Yellowstone’s East Gate. The road between Cody and the east entrance of Yellowstone National Park also affords some of the best wildlife viewing in the region, and the rock formations and lava flows with names – provided by imaginative locals – such as “Old Woman and Her Cabin,” “Laughing Pig Rock,” “Snoopy the Dog,” and “Chinese Wall” provide some geological levity. This road trip takes travelers along U.S. Highway 14-16-20 through the valley east of the park in Shoshone National Forest, the country’s first designated national forest and home to the oldest ranger station and past Pahaska Tepee, Buffalo Bill’s hunting lodge. Travelers see the eastern half of the park with easy access to Yellowstone Lake, Hayden Valley, the Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone River, Dunraven Pass and Lamar Valley. Road trippers often combine this route with the aforementioned Chief Joseph Scenic Byway.

Bighorn Basin. South of Cody are badlands and Meeteetse, a tiny Western town known for its charm and lately, its chocolate. Cowboy, dedicated chocolatier and local celebrity Tim Kellogg’s shop, The Meeteetse Chocolatier, serves up preservative-free truffles in wide-ranging combinations. South on Highway 120 is the town of Thermopolis, home of the world’s largest free-flowing hot springs.

Bighorn Mountain. This road makes its way through the towns of Powell and Lovell and the Bighorn Canyon National Recreation Area as well as  the Pryor Mountain Wild Horse Range, home to more than 120 free-roaming wild horses. Along the way is the mysterious 74-foot stone circle called the Medicine Wheel, which some people think had religious or astronomical implications to ancient tribes and the town of Greybull, named for a legendary albino bison bull that was sacred to American Indians in the region. Some of the world’s finest dinosaur fossil beds are nearby, too. Head out to the Heart Mountain Interpretive Center, just north of Cody. This educational facility is located on the site of a Japanese American internment camp that housed some 14,000 people during World War II.

For complete details about all five scenic drives, visit http://www.yellowstonecountry.org/things-to-do/scenic-byways/.

 

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Yellowstone Country is comprised of the towns of Cody, Powell and Meeteetse as well as the valley east of Yellowstone National Park.

The area of Park County is called “Buffalo Bill’s Cody/Yellowstone Country” because it was the playground of Buffalo Bill Cody himself. Buffalo Bill founded the town of Cody in 1896, and the entire region was driven and is still heavily influenced by the vision of the Colonel. Today its broad streets, world-class museum Buffalo Bill Center of the West and thriving western culture host nearly 1 million visitors annually.

 

Related hashtags:

#YellowstoneCountry

#CodyWyoming

#CenteroftheWest

#BuffaloBill

#Yellowstone

#Wyoming

Media contact:

Mesereau Travel Public Relations

(970) 286-2751

mona@mesereaupr.com

tom@mesereaupr.com

longmire

Robert Taylor is “Longmire”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Longmire Comes to Cody; Small Town Celebrates July 4 in a Big Way, and Actors Robert Taylor and Adam Bartley are Leading the Way this Year

 

CODY, Wyo., May 23, 2017 – Any troublemakers thinking about giving Cody’s finest a hard time this Independence Day might want to think twice, or they may end up face to face with Longmire and “The Ferg.”

Adam Bartley is "The Ferg"

Adam Bartley is “The Ferg”

Actors Robert Taylor and Adam Bartley, who play Sheriff Walt Longmire and Deputy Archie “The Ferg” Ferguson in the A&E “Longmire” series, will join the likes of John Wayne, Steven Seagal, Wilford Brimley, Red Steagall and Chuck Yeager as grand marshal of the July 4 Cody Stampede Parade. And by the time the popular actors lead Wyoming’s largest Independence Day parade down the length of Sheridan Avenue, the town will be well-primed.

July 4 is the fifth and final day of Cody’s annual birthday bash for the country, a 98-year tradition.

The celebration is called the Cody Stampede, and nearly every event – from the rodeos to the parades – reflects the equestrian heritage of this tiny northwestern Wyoming town. Horses have been a big part of Cody’s heritage ever since Buffalo Bill rode through this region and envisioned a town there.

The Cody Stampede Parade is a major event in the state of Wyoming

The Cody Stampede Parade is a major event in the state of Wyoming

This year’s events kick off on Friday, June 30, with the Cody/Yellowstone Bull-Riding Event. The fun continues Saturday, July 1 through July 4 with four Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association (PRCA)-sanctioned Stampede Rodeos; a Kiddies Parade July 2; Stampede Parades July 3 and 4; a 5K/10K run/walk July 4; and the three-day Wild West Extravaganza Craft Fair July 2 – 4. There are also musical performances by regional acts in outdoor venues throughout town.

The Stampede Parade on the morning of July 4 is especially fun, with at least three marching bands from around the country parading down Sheridan Avenue, Cody’s main street.

Following the Cody Stampede Rodeo on July 4, Cody caps the annual celebration with the Cody Skylighters Fireworks Show.

Previous grand marshals included John Wayne

Previous grand marshals included John Wayne

“It doesn’t take much of an imagination to picture Walt Longmire and The Ferg marching purposefully down Sheridan Avenue to deal with the crime of the day, so we think they are perfectly suited to lead our Independence Day parade,” said Claudia Wade, director of the Park County Travel Council. “As a town that has remained true to Western traditions, the addition of ‘Longmire’ to lead the parade promises to be a day of family-friendly frivolity. I can hardly wait.”

The Start of the Stampede
In April 1920, a group of local leaders including a lawyer, dude ranch owner, newspaper editor and a publicity-savvy and nationally known female novelist met to talk about how to transform the town’s small annual July 4 celebration into an event that would showcase Cody’s authentic Western dude ranches and other attractions as well as its proximity to two entrances to Yellowstone National Park.

Among the most vocal of those leaders – and the only female present – was Caroline Lockhart, whose best-selling novels in the early 1900s had earned her fame and fortune. Once the group settled on naming the event the Cody Stampede and sketching a general framework, Lockhart took the reins as president. She set about publicizing it in the Park County Enterprise – Buffalo Bill’s newspaper, which was later renamed the Cody Enterprise, and is still in operation today. She also organized fundraisers and invited famous rodeo performers to demonstrate their skills at the nightly rodeos.

These town leaders had little idea that they would create an annual event that would be enjoyed and remembered by generations of Cody residents and visitors from around the world.

Visiting during the Cody Stampede
Wade advises travelers to plan far ahead if they want to experience the Cody Stampede. The town’s inns, lodges, hotels and guest ranches offer more than 1,600 rooms, and most of those sell out during the Cody Stampede.

Visitors will find an array of activities to keep them engaged when not enjoying Cody Stampede events. Among them, the Sleeping Giant Ski Area Zip Line, Cody Firearms Experience, Dan Miller’s Cowboy Music Revue, Heart Mountain WW II Interpretive Center, Buffalo Bill Center of the West, Old Trail Town and the Cody Trolley Tour. There are also many outdoor adventures such as hiking, rock climbing, fly fishing and whitewater rafting.

###

Yellowstone Country is comprised of the towns of Cody, Powell and Meeteetse as well as the valley east of Yellowstone National Park.
The area of Park County is called “Buffalo Bill’s Cody/Yellowstone Country” because it was the playground of Buffalo Bill Cody himself. Buffalo Bill founded the town of Cody in 1896, and the entire region was driven and is still heavily influenced by the vision of the Colonel. Today its broad streets, world-class museum Buffalo Bill Center of the West and thriving western culture host nearly 1 million visitors annually.

Related hashtags:
#YellowstoneCountry
#CodyStampede
#CodyWyoming
#CenteroftheWest
#BuffaloBill
#Yellowstone
#Wyoming

Media contact:
Mesereau Travel Public Relations
1-970-286-2751
mona@mesereaupr.com
tom@mesereaupr.com

 

horseback riding

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Getting Outdoors in Buffalo Bill’s Cody/Yellowstone Country

Biking jpeg

Yellowstone Country features many miles of trails for bicyclists.

CODY, Wyo., April 27, 2017 – With its wide open spaces, miles of forests, soaring mountains, crystal clear streams and seemingly never-ending trails, Buffalo Bill’s Cody Yellowstone Country attracts outdoor enthusiasts looking for peaceful, exciting, modern and authentic experiences.

“There are still plenty of places where you can leave the electronics behind and enjoy a completely natural experience that usually ends with you wondering why you don’t do it more often,” said Claudia Wade, director of the Park County Travel Council. “This is one of those places.”

Here are some those activities that Wade recommends:

Try your hand at Cody’s blue-ribbon trout fishing in one of Cody’s many streams, lakes and rivers. Local guides can be hired to take anglers to their own favorite spots. Fishing licenses: $14 daily for non-residents.

Absaroka Bikefitters and Backcountry Guides

It is easy to get away on hike in the region.

Raft the Shoshone River. With an above-average snowpack this year, local outfitters are predicting flows of 5-6,000 cfs above the Buffalo Bill Reservoir with Class III-IV rapids. Below the dam water levels will approach 8,000 cfs with solid Class III rapids. And the large snowpack should allow for a longer season. Cody is home to several outfitters offering float and whitewater raft trips that last from just a couple of hours to a half day. The town’s rafting outfitters offer partial- and full-day tours that pass through breathtaking red rock canyons with white-water rapids with names like “Hole in the Wall,” and “Sundance Kid.”

Go two-wheeling. Mountain-biking in Yellowstone Country provides visitors with a chance to take in the scenery at their own pace while getting some exercise in the fresh Wyoming air. Riders won’t want to miss the new Beck Lake Mountain Bike Park and Trail System southeast of Cody.

Hit the links. Park County features two mature 18-hole championship golf courses. Olive Glenn Golf and Country Club opened in 1970 and has been rated by Golf Digest as one of the “Best Places to Play.” It contains a fully staffed golf shop with PGA professional and features a practice range and putting green on site. The full-service restaurant is open year-round and the course is open April 1 through November 1: Powell Golf Club measures up to 7,000 yards and is open April through October: daily, 8am-dusk. Call for pricing and tee times.

Rafting jpeg

Rapids up to Class III are found on the Shoshone River.

Hit the trails. Head in any direction and go for a day or an overnight backcountry hike. Much of the land in Buffalo Bill’s Cody/Yellowstone Country is public land and part of the Shoshone National Forest, Bureau of Land Management and Yellowstone National Park featuring astonishing rock formations, broad sweeps of forest, wide open meadows, rivers, lakes and abundant wildlife.

Saddle up. With its wide streets, nightly rodeo and history, Cody was home base to Buffalo Bill Cody’s Wild West Show. Horseback riding still is the authentic activity in Cody/Yellowstone Country. The area’s guest and dude ranches as well as the area’s horse riding concessioners provide the experience of reliving life in the rugged west.

***

Yellowstone Country is comprised of the towns of Cody, Powell and Meeteetse as well as the valley east of Yellowstone National Park.

The Park County Travel Council website lists information about vacation packages, special events, guide services, weather and more. Travelers wishing to arrange a vacation can also call the Park County Travel Council at 1-800-393-2639.

Related hashtags:
#YellowstoneCountry
#CodyWyoming
#CenteroftheWest
#BuffaloBill

Media contact:
Mesereau Travel Public Relations
(970) 286-2751
mona@mesereaupr.com
tom@mesereaupr.com

irma


The Cherrywood bar in the Irma Hotel Dining Room was presented to Buffalo Bill Cody by Queen Victoria. Buffalo Bill charmed the queen when his Wild West Show performed in London. The bar is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Living History in Buffalo Bill’s Cody/Yellowstone Country

 

scout

“The Scout” at the Buffalo Bill Center of the West.

CODY, Wyo., April 14, 2017 – Making history is something Buffalo Bill’s Cody/Yellowstone Country has been doing for quite a long time. Long before Buffalo Bill Cody founded the once-raucous frontier town that bears his name, and long after the final incarcerees were released from a World War II Japanese-American internment camp at Heart Mountain, this northwestern corner of Wyoming has been a living testament to colorful history of the American West.

“We don’t have to hit our visitors over the head with history because the past is an authentic part of a modern-day Cody adventure,” said Claudia Wade, director of the Park County Travel Council, the marketing arm for the region comprised of the towns of Cody, Meeteetse, Powell and the valley east of Yellowstone National Park. “From the buffalo horn bonnets on display in the Plains Indian Museum to the rodeo clowns that have been protecting Cody Nite Rodeo performers for nearly a century, history plays a part in nearly every Cody experience.”

Here are some places to experience the history that helped shape Yellowstone Country’s character:

Jeremiah johnston

Jeremiah “Liver Eating” Johnston.

Collections of tribal artistry at the Plains Indian Museum, one of five Buffalo Bill Center of the West museums. This acclaimed museum includes creations of many Plains peoples such as eagle feather bonnets, bear claw necklaces, buffalo hide tipis and tipi furnishings, shields, cradles, peace medals and moccasins.

Paintings of the day-to-day life of incarcerees at Heart Mountain Interpretive Center. This award-winning museum opened in 2011 and includes poignant exhibits of incarcerees at the internment camp. “All You Can Carry,” the introductory film at the center, includes the paintings of Estelle Ishigo, a Caucasian woman who chose to remain at her Japanese-American husband’s side when he was imprisoned during World War II. A talented artist, Ishigo chronicled the day-to-day lives of the camp’s 14,000 residents with sketches, drawings and watercolors depicting the brutal conditions of the camp and camp life.

The Visitor Center at the Buffalo Bill Dam. Once the tallest concrete dam in the world and a National Civil Engineering Landmark, the Buffalo Bill Dam was operating before Buffalo Bill Cody’s death in 1917. The visitor center’s exhibits show how the dam fulfilled the forward-thinking showman’s goal to bring a reliable water source to the Bighorn Basin.

register

The register at the Chamberlin Inn features Hemigway’s signature.

The Cherrywood bar at the Irma Hotel. In 1902, seven years after he founded the town of Cody, William F. “Buffalo Bill” Cody built the Irma Hotel on the town’s then main street – 12th Street – and named it after his youngest daughter. Listed on the National Register of Historic Places, the hotel’s famous room-long Cherrywood bar – still in use today in what is now the hotel dining room – was presented to Buffalo Bill by England’s Queen Victoria, who was charmed by Buffalo Bill and his Wild West Show when the company performed in London.

“Buffalo Bill – The Scout” at the Buffalo Bill Center of the West. Created by famed New York sculptress Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney, The Scout has greeted visitors to the Buffalo Bill Center of the West since 1924. The sculpture is mounted on a stone base that represents Cedar Mountain, where Buffalo Bill wished to be buried, and it was created at the behest of Caroline Lockhart, editor and publisher of the Cody Enterprise. The famous heiress funded the cost of the sculpture, and her son Cornelius later funded the creation of the Whitney Western Art Museum.

Hemingway’s signature in the guest register at the Chamberlin Inn. In 1932 “Ernest Hemingway of Key West, Florida” had just completed the manuscript for Death in the Afternoon and was enjoying some time fishing the Clark’s Fork River by day and swapping stories with the locals in the Irma bar at night. The register is displayed at the inn and open to the page containing Hemingway’s signature. And the room in which Hemingway stayed is available to overnight guests.

Indian Trade Musket at the new Cody Firearms Experience. Opened last year, the Cody Firearms Experience provides visitors with a chance to shoot the guns that won the West in a safe, supervised and educational setting. Visitors can choose from a replica of an Indian Trade Musket, US Model 1795, Flintlock Musket, Colt Walker Revolver and Winchester Model 1873 Rifle and fire them in a state-of-the-art indoor shooting range.

Buffalo Bill’s hunting lodge, Pahaska Teepee. Located just outside the East entrance to Yellowstone National Park, Cody brought his hunting pals – including Theodore Roosevelt and the Prince of Monaco – to this rustic lodge. Cody was named “Long Hair” by American Indians in the region, which in their tongue was pronounced “Pahaska.” The rustic log lodge displays many gifts given to Cody by guests. Modern cabins, a restaurant and gift shop make this a great stop for travelers before they head into the park.

Cabins and gravesites at Old Trail Town/Museum of the Old West. This enclave of 26 authentic frontier buildings includes one used by Butch Cassidy and his infamous Hole-in-the-Wall Gang. One of the town’s many gravesites belongs to Jeremiah “Liver Eating” Johnston – portrayed by actor Robert Redford in the 1972 film.

The teller’s cage at Meeteetse Bank Museum. Butch Cassidy once lived in Meeteetse, and despite his reputation as a prolific and highly successful bank robber, he pledged not to rob the Meeteetse Bank so he and his friends would have a safe place to stash their ill-gotten cash. That bank is now the Meeteetse Bank Museum, and it still displays the original teller’s cage, vault and many other artifacts.

***

Yellowstone Country is comprised of the towns of Cody, Powell and Meeteetse as well as the valley east of Yellowstone National Park.

The Park County Travel Council website lists information about vacation packages, special events, guide services, weather and more. Travelers wishing to arrange a vacation can also call the Park County Travel Council at 1-800-393-2639.

Related hashtags:
#YellowstoneCountry
#CodyWyoming
#CenteroftheWest
#BuffaloBill

Media contact:
Mesereau Travel Public Relations
(970) 286-2751
mona@mesereaupr.com
tom@mesereaupr.com

4TH OF JULY

Photo courtesy of the Cody Enterprise

JOHN WAYNE

John Wayne was grand marshal of the parade in 1976.

Celebrate July 4 in a Big Way in the Small Town of Cody, Wyoming

CODY, Wyo., March 28, 2017 – It takes Cody, Wyoming five days to celebrate the Fourth of July, and town leaders are already fine-tuning plans for the country’s big birthday bash this year. Just as they have been every spring for the last 98 years.

The celebration is called the Cody Stampede, and nearly every event – from the rodeos to the parades – reflects the equestrian heritage of this tiny northwestern Wyoming town. Horses have been a big part of Cody’s heritage ever since Buffalo Bill rode through this region and envisioned a town there.

PARADE

The parade will feature multiple marching bands.

This year’s events kick off on Friday, June 30, with the Cody/Yellowstone Bull-Riding Event. The fun continues Saturday, July 1 through July 4 with four Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association (PRCA)-sanctioned Stampede Rodeos; a Kiddies Parade July 2; Stampede Parades July 3 and 4; a 5K/10K run/walk July 4; and the three-day Wild West Extravaganza Craft Fair July 2 – 4. There are also musical performances by regional acts in outdoor venues throughout town.

RODEO

Four PRCA-sanctioned events will be held.

The Stampede Parade on the mornings of July 3 and 4 is especially fun, with at least three marching bands from around the country parading down Sheridan Avenue, Cody’s main street. The parade’s 2017 grand marshal will be announced soon. Last year’s grand marshal was storyteller Red Steagall, and previous years the town has welcomed John Wayne, Steven Seagal, Chuck Yeager and Wilford Brimley.

Following the Cody Stampede Rodeo on July 4, Cody caps the annual celebration with the Cody Skylighters Fireworks Show.

“Right around now, the town’s residents begin sketching plans for parade floats, training for races and rodeo events and speculating about who will be named this year’s parade grand marshal,” said Claudia Wade, director of the Park County Travel Council. “The Cody Stampede is one of the longest running July 4 celebrations in the country, and after nearly a century the goals of the event’s original planners have remained the same.”

The Start of the Stampede
In April 1920, a group of local leaders including a lawyer, dude ranch owner, newspaper editor, and a publicity-savvy and nationally known female novelist met to talk about how to transform town’s small annual July 4 celebration into an event that would showcase Cody’s authentic Western dude ranches and other attractions as well as its proximity to two entrances to Yellowstone National Park.

Among the most vocal of those leaders – and the only female present – was Caroline Lockhart, whose best-selling novels in the early 1900s had earned her fame and fortune. Once the group settled on naming the event the Cody Stampede and sketched a general framework, Lockhart took the reins as president. She set about publicizing it in the Park County Enterprise – Buffalo Bill’s newspaper, which was later renamed the Cody Enterprise, and is still in operation today. She also organized fundraisers and invited famous rodeo performers to demonstrate their skills at the nightly rodeos.

These town leaders had little idea that they would create an annual event that would be enjoyed and remembered by generations of Cody residents and visitors from around the world.

Visiting during the Cody Stampede
Wade advises travelers to plan far ahead if they want to experience the Cody Stampede. The town’s inns, lodges, hotels and guest ranches offer more than 1,600 rooms, and most of those sell out during the Cody Stampede.

Visitors will find an array of activities to keep them engaged when not enjoying Cody Stampede events. Among them, the Sleeping Giant Ski Area Zip Line, Cody Firearms Experience, Dan Miller’s Cowboy Music Revue, Heart Mountain WW II Interpretive Center, Buffalo Bill Center of the West, Old Trail Town and the Cody Trolley Tour. There are also many outdoor adventures such as hiking, rock climbing fly fishing and whitewater rafting.

###

Yellowstone Country is comprised of the towns of Cody, Powell and Meeteetse as well as the valley east of Yellowstone National Park.

The area of Park County is called “Buffalo Bill’s Cody/Yellowstone Country” because it was the playground of Buffalo Bill Cody himself. Buffalo Bill founded the town of Cody in 1896, and the entire region was driven and is still heavily influenced by the vision of the Colonel. Today its broad streets, world-class museum Buffalo Bill Center of the West and thriving western culture host nearly 1 million visitors annually.
Related hashtags:

#YellowstoneCountry
#CodyStampede
#CodyWyoming
#CenteroftheWest
#BuffaloBill
#Yellowstone
#Wyoming

Media contact:
Mesereau Travel Public Relations
1-970-286-2751
mona@mesereaupr.com
tom@mesereaupr.com