Corrie n. Cody's Travel Blog Dividing image

Zippety Doo Dah! Zip Lines Coming to...

September 4th, 2015 by Park County Travel Council | Be the first to comment!

Zippety Doo Dah! Zip Lines Coming to Yellowstone Country

On occasion, I feel the need for speed.

When I want an adrenaline rush in the winter, I usually head over to Sleeping Giant Ski Area just west of downtown Cody and ski the intermediate runs. My favorite ski run is Red Star because it is parallel to the ski area boundary and I get some great views of the mountains and valley below.

In the summer, at least these days, it’s not quite as easy for me to get my speed fix. I used to achieve some serious speed when I was a barrel racer at the Cody Nite Rodeo, but those days are long over. When I watch those beautiful young cowgirls with their hair trailing in the wind steering their horses around the barrels with incredible finesse, I can still remember the sheer joy of the race. And I can remember how it felt to win.

So I was super excited to hear that Sleeping Giant Ski Area is building new dual zip lines which will have  fabulous views. And the best part, at least for this former competitor, is that you can race your friends on each zip because the Canadian Read More


West Meets Midwest

August 24th, 2015 by Park County Travel Council | Be the first to comment!

If you see me walking around Cody next week telling stories about the town to someone who is feverishly taking notes, please don’t be concerned.

Tap your feet along to the sounds of Americana, bluegrass and songs of the American West at Dan Miller’s Cowboy Music Revue.

You see, we are hosting a conference for the Midwest Travel Writers Association (MTWA), and this group of journalists is coming for more than just Yellowstone Country’s Western brand of hospitality.Over the years there is a good chance you have read an article by one of these writers. Before the Internet turned our lives upside down, travel writers researched and wrote their stories for magazines, newspapers, newsletters and other publications. Many of those publications are now found online, and professionals supply the stories.

This conference is our opportunity to showcase our attractions. The plan is to start with a welcome reception at the Chamberlin Inn followed by a short walk over to enjoy Dan Miller’s Cowboy Music Revue. I know that Dan will promptly win over the female journalists in the crowd, but we cannot just send them home after his performance. We will take the next several days making a trip to Yellowstone, taking Read More


Stylin’ During Rendezvous Royale Week

August 17th, 2015 by Park County Travel Council | Be the first to comment!

I don’t want to brag, but around the town of Cody, I’m pretty well known as a cowgirl fashionista.

I have and wear it all, from fringed leather jackets to intricately designed pendants, almost always with my day-of-the-week cowboy boots. (Yes, I have seven pairs of cowboy boots. Doesn’t everyone?)

Even my home is known for its style, and almost every wall is adorned with something distinctive that reflects my love of the American West.

The Buffalo Bill Art Show & Sale is a nationally renowned Western art show & sale.

But maintaining my reputation as an ever-stylin’ cowgirl-about-town means that I’m constantly updating my wardrobe, jewelry and art collections with the latest pieces by the best Western designers. That’s why every year I’m always among the first to register for the Buffalo Bill Art Show & Sale during Cody’s Rendezvous Royale week September 21-26, 2015.

Now in its 34th year, this annual event is one of the biggest art shows in the American West, and it draws art enthusiasts from around the country. The show kicks off with a reception and a silent auction beginning Wednesday, Aug. 26. At the reception in the Buffalo Bill Center of the West, we’ll get our first Read More


Corrie’s Cool Tips for Visiting Cody...

August 10th, 2015 by Park County Travel Council | Be the first to comment!

Some like it hot, but I’m not one of them. And lately it’s been a little on the hot side around here, with daytime temperatures in the high 80s. I’m not complaining, because Corrie doesn’t complain. Just saying, well, baby, it’s hot outside.

In Yellowstone Country, however, even on the hottest of days there are plenty of things to do – outside and inside – to be cool and stay cool. Here are five ideas:

Enjoy the beauty of Yellowstone Country on horseback

Go for a trail ride. Most of our dude and guest ranches offer trail rides – short ones, long ones, overnight ones, multi-day ones. And many of the rides meander through forests of lodgepole pines, Englemann Spruces and Subalpine Firs, which offer shade from the sun. And the stunning beauty of Yellowstone Country is guaranteed to take your mind off the heat.

Paddle away an afternoon. Between Clark’s Fork River and the North Fork of the Shoshone River, there are plenty of paddling options, including whitewater rafting, family-friendly floating, duckie kayaking and core-busting stand-up paddle boarding (SUP).

Adventure out on one of five loop tours

Crank up the AC and go for a road trip. Yellowstone Country is home to numerous Read More


Cody Museums Rock the True West

August 3rd, 2015 by Park County Travel Council | Be the first to comment!

It feels good to be a winner, and a lot of people involved with our very own Buffalo Bill Center of the West are feeling purty goshdern good today. (Read on to see why I’m suddenly reverting to my cowgirl vernacular.)

America’s frontier history comes to life in True West, the world’s oldest, continuously published Western Americana magazine.

Buffalo Bill Center of the West was just named the Top Western Museum for 2015 by True West magazine, which as many of you know is a top-notch magazine covering the authentic West. I got a sneak peek at the upcoming September issue of the magazine, which highlights the Buffalo Bill Museum’s “Man of the West, Man of the World: The Life and Legacy of William F. Buffalo Bill.’”

Yes, yes, I know. As my mama always said, “Lettin’ the cat outta the bag is a whole lot easier than puttin’ it back,” but I’m so tickled that the Center of the West topped the list that I couldn’t keep it to myself. I hope the fine writers at True West magazine won’t be too ticked at me, and if all of you buy a copy of the magazine, maybe they won’t be. Look for Read More


Our Kind of Competition

July 27th, 2015 by Park County Travel Council | Be the first to comment!

Here in Cody – for that matter, here in Wyoming – we have a healthy respect for guns, gun safety and firearms in general.

Hunting has been a way of life for most people here, and for many of our ancestors it was essential for survival. When I grew up all of my friends and I received “the talk” from our parents about what to do if we came across a gun (don’t touch it, tell an adult immediately) and were instructed on proper handling and shooting once we were old enough.

Guns aren’t toys. We don’t own guns to be cool, and people who just leave them lying around in the open or otherwise mishandle them are told to straighten up.

We take gun safety seriously and are completely flabbergasted when see the way some people treat firearms. Who in their right mind would actually shove a loaded pistol down the front their pants? What could possibly go wrong?

All of my lessons returned to me this week as I began to prepare earnestly for the 22nd Annual Buffalo Bill Invitational Shootout which will be held Aug. 6-8, 2015 at the Buffalo Bill Center of the West’s Cody Firearms Museum and at the Read More


Moving Ground in Yellowstone Country

July 17th, 2015 by Park County Travel Council | Be the first to comment!

We have a lot of thermal activity here in Yellowstone Country.

Old Faithful’s eruptions varies from 51 to 120 minutes

Inside Yellowstone National Park (around here we just call it “The Park”) is the world’s largest concentration of geysers and other thermal features totaling in the 10,000 neighborhood. Everybody knows about Old Faithful, but many people are surprised to find so many other geysers as well as fumaroles, hot springs and mud pots scattered throughout the park.

Here in Cody we also have our share of thermal features, and I’m not talking about our “hot” cowboy musicians. Back in the early 1800s, John Colter was a member of the Lewis and Clark expedition who went on side trips. Colter made his way in what are now Yellowstone and Grand Teton National Parks. He also made it to what is now our humble town of Cody, where he came upon thermal activity that became known as “Colter’s Hell.”

In 1807 John Colter discovered an active geyser district: steam mixed with sulfur fumes and shooting flames escaped through vents in the valley floor. This is now known as Colter’s Hell

Heat and the smell of sulfur lend themselves to colorful nicknames. That thermal area is Read More


Musings on the 2015 Cody Stampede

July 10th, 2015 by Park County Travel Council | Be the first to comment!

The 2015 Cody Stampede is in the history books, and before I focus on the second half of the summer (don’t even think about arguing with me that summer just started June 21) I want to share a few observations.

It always seems there are cowboys competing who are named Cody. Don’t believe me? Look it up. I saw five just in the final standings. You won’t find too many Clevelands or Bostons.

The action never stops at the four Cody Stampede Rodeo performances.

Some other great Western first names were Cimarron, Shane and Levi. There was even a guy named Jesse James. My favorite, however, was Clayton Moore who won the steer wrestling competition. And he did it without any help from a trusted sidekick named Tonto.

When the second Cody Stampede board member walked past me wearing a pink shirt, I wondered what was happening. Turns out on July 2, they along with the Cowboy Up Drill Team and several spectators were “Tough Enough To Wear Pink” making a statement in support of breast cancer research. Well played, all of you. I tip my 10-gallon hat in your direction.

Opening Ceremonies of the Cody Stampede Rodeo.

The Stampede paid out almost $350,000 Read More


What Happened in Yellowstone Country a...

July 6th, 2015 by Park County Travel Council | Be the first to comment!

The Fourth of July holiday parade is one of the biggest events in Cody, Wyoming every year, and one of the things that is especially exciting is finding out who was selected to be the parade grand marshal. The honor of grand marshal has been bestowed on many recognizable individuals – John Wayne, Bobby Allison, Steven Seagal and Chuck Yeager, to name a few. Chances are, though, you haven’t heard of this year’s grand marshal, but his selection has had me brushing up on my Cody history. I thought you might like hearing about what I learned.

2015 Cody Stampede Parade Grand Marshal Chief Joseph Medicine Crow High-Bird.

Our 2015 Grand Marshal was Dr. Joseph Medicine Crow. He is 101 years old and is the only living person to receive the oral history from the Custer Battlefield. His grandfather was a scout for General Custer. What was it like to live in Yellowstone Country when Dr. Medicine Crow was a youngster? I found some clues in “The Cody Club 1900-1999,” a book about the history of the Cody Country Chamber of Commerce.

To put it literally, it’s been a rough road.

1914 – The year Dr. Medicine Crow was born, the Cody Club Read More


Heart Mountain Barrack Returning

June 26th, 2015 by Park County Travel Council | Be the first to comment!

When out-of-towners come for a Cody Country vacation it is usually the park or rodeo or fishing or Buffalo Bill Center of the West or something like that which gets them here. Many visitors leave, however, with a different perspective after they experience something that turns some of their preconceived notions upside down.

Perhaps it is a trip to Old Trail Town where they learn that whole families lived in small cabins as they worked hard to survive before they even considered what it would take to prosper. We’re talking about cabins without plumbing. Or wi-fi.

Heart Mountain Relocation Camp was one of 10 in the U.S. built at the beginning of WWII.

One of, if not the most, profound experiences to me is the Heart Mountain Relocation Center between Cody and Powell. During World War II nearly 14,000 (120,000 total at various camps in the West) Japanese Americans were forced from their homes – primarily in California – and dropped off at a remote, barren area where they stayed until the war ended. They lived in barracks built with green lumber, no insulation and virtually no amenities.

Some 450 of these barracks were built, and from 1942 to 1945 Heart Mountain Relocation Read More