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Why I Can’t Wait to Spring Into Yellowstone!

May 12th, 2015 by Park County Travel Council | Be the first to comment!

Hello. My name is Corrie N. Cody, and I’m addicted to birdwatching. Don’t laugh. Well, go ahead and laugh, but please try to understand that those of us who stop in the middle of whatever we are doing outside to watch the flutter of activity in trees really can’t help ourselves. I may forget my smart phone when I leave the house, but I rarely forget my dog-eared Yellowstone Wildlife Field Guide.

And the prospect of hanging out with other birdwatching addicts is one reason I wouldn’t think of missing this year’s Spring into Yellowstone: Cody Birding and Wildlife Festival. This is a prime opportunity to connect with others like me who are passionate about the wild things that roam our land and fly through our skies.

Spring storms rarely deter our feathery friends

Spring storms rarely deter our feathery friends.

This year’s festival is May 13 through 17, and I’ll be going on field trips and attending seminars led by some of the biggest names in birding and nature photography as well as some of the top biologists in the region. I even purchased brand new binoculars to help me see the region’s wildlife more clearly.

Spring brings many mamas and babies out to meadows and open areas

Spring brings many mamas and babies out to meadows and open areas.

Of the 32 programs that are planned for the festival, there are several that I can’t wait to attend. There is a Heart Mountain Ranch hike led by the dedicated folks at The Nature Conservancy, a fun seminar called “Surf’s Up: Geology and Paleontology of the Cody Area; and another one called Viewing Shore Birds from the Water: Kayaking or Paddle Boarding at Newton Lake. I will have no trouble filling my time during the festival.

The festival planners have put all the details on their website. And my friends coming into town found out about lodging options on the Travel Council website.

Tall Spring grasses serve as protection from predators searching for young wildlife.

Tall Spring grasses serve as protection from predators searching for young wildlife.

I hope you’ll think about joining me for this exciting week in the natural areas of Yellowstone Country, and I look forward to seeing you on a hike or at a seminar.

Until then, I’m lovin’ life and looking up in Buffalo Bill’s Cody/Yellowstone Country.

 


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